Is your manager taking your harassment claim seriously?

When a coworker harasses you, your employer should do what is necessary to make it stop. What happens when that is not the case?

When an employee reports harassment, the employer has the duty under the law to put an end to Discover some of the things you may do should your harassment claim stall.

Check on the complaint status

An investigation of your claim should begin as soon as you report the abuse. Interviews of those involved should commence so the employer can get a complete picture. If you do not receive an update or see any action within a reasonable time, you should follow up.

Put your concerns in writing

Your manager may assure you things are moving but never take time to revisit your allegations. If this happens, you may want to draft a written account of what happened. Include specifics, such as:

  • Dates of the harassment
  • Events leading to and following the encounter
  • Locations in and out of the office
  • Names of witnesses

Harassment may also occur online or via text and email. If this is the case for you, include copies or screenshots of relevant conversations.

Go to human resources

When you do not feel like your manager is doing his or her due diligence, or the harassment gets worse, you may want to pass the report up the chain of command. If you have a human resources department, submit your claim and evidence to the representative in charge.

Your safety at work extends beyond your physical body. Your mental health and welfare should also remain a priority for your employer. When you report harassment by a coworker, ensure that your company takes it seriously enough to keep you safe.